RV Insurance

If you are considering purchasing any type of camper, motor home, travel trailer or fifth wheel you will want to make sure you have the right insurance for it.

You may be able to bundle your recreational vehicle with your home or auto insurance policy, but it might not give you enough coverage.

RV insurance provides coverage on Class A, B, and C motor-homes, camper vans, and motor coaches.  Your insurance agent can also provide you with RV insurance for your travel trailer, fifth wheel and pop-up camper. Inform your agent if your RV is stationary on a lot or piece of land year round. Bundles the insurance penguin next to a RV.

Types of coverage offered are:

  • Comprehensive and Collision
  • Total Loss Replacement
  • Emergency Expenses
  • Towing and Roadside Assistance
  • Campsite/Vacation Liability
  • Full Time and Stationary Travel Trailer Program

For all your RV insurance needs contact Insurance Advisors, Inc.

First Time Driver: Best Car

What’s The Best Car For A First Time Driver?First Car

Parents who are car shopping for teen drivers know that deciding which factors to prioritize can be difficult. The goal is to make the most sensible choice.  You will need to consider three factors above all others:  safety, reliability, and true cost to own. Auto insurance is the first element of added cost because of the experience and risk factor. The second cost is related to maintenance and reliability.

Things To Consider

The size of your teen’s vehicle plays a significant role in its overall safety. Parents should avoid the smallest vehicle, since even a subcompact with the best crash test scores won’t provide as much collision protection as a large vehicle. Parents should avoid the largest vehicles as well, since these can be difficult to maneuver for new drivers. Midsize cars are best because of their ideal mix of crash protection and maneuverability. AAA recommends that parents avoid SUVs when shopping for teens, saying that the vehicles are “more prone to roll over in extreme driving conditions.” The newer models are safer than older ones because they offer stability control.

Four-cylinder engines offer adequate power, but not so much that they’re likely to tempt teen drivers into engaging in risky behavior. “Teens overestimate their skills and underestimate the risks of driving, so choose a vehicle accordingly. Driving behavior is the most crucial factor affecting your teen driver’s safety behind the wheel. Still, it’s clear a safe vehicle fosters a safer driving experience.

The 2009-2013 models listed below all offer top crash test scores and low TCO (True Cost to Own). And, all used models appear on CarMD’s Vehicle Health Index, which means they rank among the top 10 percent of all vehicles on the road when it comes to dependability.

  1. 2009 Honda Accord
  2. 2009 Toyota Camry
  3. 2010 Chevrolet Malibu
  4. 2010 Volkswagen Jetta
  5. 2011 Hyundai Sonata
  6. 2012 Honda Accord
  7. 2012 Hyundai Sonata
  8. 2012 Toyota Camry
  9. 2012 Volkswagen Jetta
  10. 2013 Chevrolet Malibu

Source http://www.edmunds.com/


Snow, Ice, & Freezing Rain: Buckle Up

Safe Winter DrivingWinter Driving Safety

The snow is a sign that winter has officially started, here are a few tips for safe winter driving. Don’t go out during a snowstorm if you can avoid it. If you do, buckle up!  If you must go out, here are some tips to share the road with snow plows:

  • Give snowplows room to work; don’t tailgate or try to pass.
  • Keep in mind, there are times when several plow trucks may block all lanes on major highways, take it slow.
  • Stay at least 4 car lengths back from snowplows and equipment.
  • Spreaders on trucks can throw salt, sand etc. that can damage close- following vehicles; again, give them room to do their job.
  • Trucks carrying salt and sand often have a sign on the back warning people to stay back. That is for your safety as well as the drivers.
  • Plow truck operators have to focus on snow removal and cannot always watch out for the drivers surrounding them; so if you try to pass, you could collide with the equipment or another vehicle.
  • Drive even slower in construction zones, even though they are inactive in winter weather.
  • Always have your headlights on, plenty of fuel and wiper fluid, and tires with ample tread.
  • Remember that a snowplow operator’s field of vision is restricted. You may see them, but they may not see you.
  • Don’t text and drive and only use your phone if you have to.