Driving Safety: Winter Survival Kit

Always Carry A Winter Survival Kit!

winter survival kit for car

Safe winter driving and lowering distractions can only go so far. Accidents happen. Everyone should carry a Winter Survival Kit in the car. In an emergency, it could save your life and the lives of your passengers. Assemble winter survival kits for all of your vehicles. Keep them inside the vehicle where they will be readily accessible. The kit should include:

  • A shovel
  • Windshield scraper/ broom
  • Flashlight with extra batteries
  • Battery powered radio
  • Water
  • Snack food/ energy bars
  • Matches & small candles
  • Extra hats socks & mittens
  • Emergency flares & reflectors
  • First aid kit with pocket knife
  • Necessary medications
  • Blankets or sleeping bag
  • Tow chain or rope
  • Road salt, sand, or cal litter for traction
  • Booster cables
  • Cell phone adapter to put into lighter
  • Fluorescent distress flag & whistle to attract attention

Kit Tips

  • Reverse batteries in flashlight to avoid accidental switching and burnout.
  • Store items in the back seat in case the trunk is jammed or froze shut.
  • Choose small packages of food that you can eat hot or cold

Winter Survival Tips

  • Keep your gas tank half full.
  • Tell someone where you’re going.
  • Stay in your vehicle – it’s a good shelter.
  • Avoid overexertion.
  • Let fresh air into your vehicle

 

Snow, Ice, & Freezing Rain: Buckle Up

Safe Winter DrivingWinter Driving Safety

The snow is a sign that winter has officially started, here are a few tips for safe winter driving. Don’t go out during a snowstorm if you can avoid it. If you do, buckle up!  If you must go out, here are some tips to share the road with snow plows:

  • Give snowplows room to work; don’t tailgate or try to pass.
  • Keep in mind, there are times when several plow trucks may block all lanes on major highways, take it slow.
  • Stay at least 4 car lengths back from snowplows and equipment.
  • Spreaders on trucks can throw salt, sand etc. that can damage close- following vehicles; again, give them room to do their job.
  • Trucks carrying salt and sand often have a sign on the back warning people to stay back. That is for your safety as well as the drivers.
  • Plow truck operators have to focus on snow removal and cannot always watch out for the drivers surrounding them; so if you try to pass, you could collide with the equipment or another vehicle.
  • Drive even slower in construction zones, even though they are inactive in winter weather.
  • Always have your headlights on, plenty of fuel and wiper fluid, and tires with ample tread.
  • Remember that a snowplow operator’s field of vision is restricted. You may see them, but they may not see you.
  • Don’t text and drive and only use your phone if you have to.